Born in Brooklyn, Carmelo Anthony and grew up playing basketball in Baltimore. He remembers what it was like living in communities without many resources.

“I want to plant seeds in those places,” says Anthony, who, in addition to earning headlines for heroics in the NBA also helps refurbish and build basketball courts for underprivileged kids. “We work to identify the needs in the areas of education, community outreach and recreation in underserved areas.”

Creating a team

Academic achievement is important in Latino communities. Anthony partnered with the Living Classrooms Foundation, the Carmelo Anthony Foundation and the Housing Authority of Baltimore City to reopen the Youth Development Center—one of many ways he gives back.

“You can’t really share who you are with the world ignoring the pieces that make up who you are as an individual.”

The power forward is proud of his heritage. For him, being Latino means strength, perseverance and pride. “You can’t really share who you are with the world ignoring the pieces that make up who you are as an individual,” he explains.

Bouncing back

Anthony has always worked to overcome obstacles, stating it’s not about being a certain minority, age or anything else: “No one is exempt from challenges. It’s more so about how you respond to the challenges life hands you.”

To combat challenges, a person has to assess what they have inside themselves to move through whatever challenge they are facing. The main message he communicates to young Latinos in the United States and Puerto Rico? “To remember the power that we possess as individuals is the power we need to overcome.”