Many Americans were first introduced to Univision television anchor Jorge Ramos when he asked now-President Trump about his immigration policies and was pushed out of the room.

"I [have] been living in this country for 35 years and have never seen such an anti-immigrant atmosphere as we are living right now," says Ramos, who is an American citizen. "I never expected to feel like a stranger after this much time, but that's how I feel sometimes. I will never be American enough for many Americans, and that's why I wrote the book, “Stranger.”  If this is happening to a dual-passport holder who is on TV every single day, imagine what happens to people who don't have that protection."

Standing strong

Still, Ramos is optimistic about the future of the Hispanic community in the United States. "I am very optimistic for two reasons. Within the struggle, we found our voice. Sometimes the only thing you can do, but the most important thing you can do, is say no. I see all over the country people who are confronting Trump and denouncing his statements. What we also have on our side are the numbers: there are 60 million Latinos in the U.S, and in 30 years there will be 100 million."

HOLDING OUT HOPE: Despite the divisive climate in America, Ramos believes racism and Trump's agenda will lose iagainst the American dream. "Regardless of the attacks... we should be very proud of who we are."


Ramos is proud to celebrate his Hispanic heritage, but one event that was important to him in celebrating the melting pot of cultures – including Hispanic people – in his new country was taking part in his first Thanksgiving in the U.S. "The idea that people were celebrating Thanksgiving, I found it very reassuring that regardless of our differences and regardless of skin color or religion, that everyone would be celebrating the same day."

Encouraging pride

As difficult as the current climate is in America, Ramos encourages Hispanic pride. "Regardless of the attacks and the political moment in which we are living, we should be very proud of who we are," he says. "It sounds very corny, but the American dream is still alive. I am an example. I don't think Trump's ideas will prevail, and racism will never prevail. I truly believe the U.S. will prevail."