Do you struggle to fit in a variety of fruits and veggies each day? How do you prepare them in your home-cooked meals?

Fruit, fiber and more

Fruits and vegetables are high in vitamins, minerals and fiber, low in saturated fat and calories and have little or no added sodium.

"Remember to stay clear of fried, au gratin, crispy, scalloped, sautéed or creamed foods, which are generally high in saturated fat and calories."

It is recommended to eat a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other nutrient-rich foods. Because different fruits and vegetables contain different nutrients, it’s important to try a variety or “eat the rainbow.” Add these healthy ingredients to foods you love, such as toppings on a pizza, fruit on your cereal or as a quick and crunchy snack. Mix them in your pasta, casseroles, soups and omelets. Experiment with different ingredients in your morning smoothies or when you serve dips at a social gathering.

Resourceful shopping

To help you cook healthier at home from start to finish, heart-healthy grocery shopping tips are available to help make the supermarket a little less overwhelming. One of the most important things to remember is to always read the food labels.

If eating at home is not always an option for you and your family, there are also tips available online on how to make healthier choices when eating out. Choosing healthier foods at a restaurant can be challenging if you don’t know what to look for. However, many restaurants offer delicious meals that are low in fats and cholesterol, or they can make many meals made-to-order.

Just remember to stay clear of fried, au gratin, crispy, scalloped, sautéed or creamed foods, which are generally high in saturated fat and calories. Instead, opt for grilled, steamed, baked or roasted alternatives. Try using these dining out tips next time you need a night off from cooking!