Did you know that 1 in 3 adult Americans are affected by incontinence? Or that incontinence is the number two reason people put their loved ones into assisted living facilities?

Speaking up

Beyond the embarrassment, people admit that they don’t know who to talk to about the symptoms they are experiencing.

Some say that they consider bringing it up to their primary care physician or gynecologist but that there never seems to be enough time or the ‘right’ moment to mention incontinence.

"Incontinence is not something of which to be ashamed but, rather, a byproduct of some of the most natural and human conditions."

And if the patient doesn’t bring it up, good chance the physician won’t either. Statistics suggest that an average of seven years will pass from the first signs of incontinence to the point where someone seeks help from a professional.                 

Adding context

So what can be done to help? For starters, the people at the National Association for Continence (NAFC) are trying to make it easier for anyone whose quality of life is compromised by incontinence to talk to a health care provider.

Incontinence is not something of which to be ashamed but, rather, a byproduct of some of the most natural and human conditions: having a baby or carrying a bit too much weight or simply aging and losing muscle tone. Secondly, those in need should know there is help available to find the right health care provider—and be prepared to discuss their personal experience with incontinence.